criminology/ug-arts-criminology

aos

Undergraduate - Area of study

Students who commenced study in 2014 should refer to this area of study entry for direction on the requirments; to check which units are currently available for enrolment, refer to the unit indexes in the the current edition of the Handbook. If you have any queries contact the managing faculty for your area of study.

print version

This area of study entry applies to students commencing this course in 2014 and should be read in conjunction with the relevant course entry in the Handbook. Any units listed for this area of study relate only to the 'Requirements' outlined in the Faculty of Arts component of any bachelors double degrees.

Managing facultyFaculty of Arts
Offered bySchool of Political and Social Inquiry
Campus(es)Caulfield, Clayton

Notes

  • Unit codes that are not linked to their entry in the Handbook are not available for study in the current year.

Description

Crime is an issue that all citizens and governments confront on a daily basis. The causes of crime, the crime problem and how it should be dealt with, are the subject of intense debate. The criminology major, which is offered on the Caulfield and Clayton campuses, provides students with the skills to understand the complexities of crime, to learn about the various stages of the criminal justice system, to critically analyse its workings and tensions, and to explore alternative strategies. Criminology students can combine an interest in areas such as policing, courts, punishment and prisons, transnational crime and international justice, criminological theory, crime and the media, crime and politics, crime prevention and victims of crime, in order to broaden their career options in criminal justice and allied areas.

Students learn to critically analyse issues of crime at the local, state, national, and global level. The first-year gateway units introduce students to various facets of crime and how it is dealt with by the criminal justice system. Second and third-year units build on this knowledge and offer students the opportunity to critically analyse and evaluate crime-related issues in greater depth.

Graduates with a major or minor in criminology may find employment in a wide range of fields, including police, courts, corrections, human services, attorney-general departments, departments of justice, law reform commissions, ombudsman offices, anti-corruption commissions, local government and the private sector.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the major, students will be able to:

  • critically analyse and compare key local, national and international trends in crime and vicitimisation across a range of jurisdictions, informed by advanced theoretical concepts
  • apply critical frameworks to the analysis of the state and non-state responses to contemporary challenges of crime control and justice
  • identify and explain crime and crime control under conditions of globalisation
  • demonstrate the capacity to formulate and develop their own research questions within key areas of criminology and translate these into a viable research project
  • work independently and collaboratively to prepare and justify creative solutions to address a range of local, national and international challenges around crime and justice in oral and written form.

Units

Minor in criminology

Students completing a minorminor (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/undergrad/arts-07.html) in criminology must complete four units (24 points), including:

(a.) two first-year gateway unitsgateway units (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/undergrad/arts-08.html) (12 points):

(b.) additional elective units from the list below (12 points)

Note: Students can take the second-year cornerstone and/or third-year capstone units as electives.

Major in criminology

Students completing a majormajor (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/undergrad/arts-07.html) in criminology must complete eight units (48 points), including:

(a.) two first-year gateway unitsgateway units (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/undergrad/arts-08.html) (12 points):

(b.) at least one second-year cornerstone unitcornerstone unit (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/undergrad/arts-08.html) (6 points), chosen from:

(c.) at least one third-year capstone unitcapstone unit (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/undergrad/arts-08.html) (6 points), chosen from:

  • ATS3004 Crime and risk
  • ATS3852 Contemporary issues in social science research**

(d.) additional elective units from the list below (24 points)

A minimum of three units (18 points) must be completed at third-year level.

Note: Students can take the remaining cornerstone and capstone units as electives.

* This unit is also a cornerstone unit for behavioural studiesbehavioural studies (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/aos/behavioural-studies/ug-arts-behavioural-studies.html) and sociologysociology (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/aos/sociology/ug-arts-sociology.html). Students doing majors in criminology and behavioural studies need to complete ATS2056 as their cornerstone unit for criminology. Students doing majors in criminology and sociology need to complete a different cornerstone unit for each major. A unit cannot be counted twice towards different majors.

** This unit is also a capstone unit for anthropologyanthropology (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/aos/anthropology/ug-arts-anthropology.html), behavioural studiesbehavioural studies (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/aos/behavioural-studies/ug-arts-behavioural-studies.html) and sociologysociology (http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/2014handbooks/aos/sociology/ug-arts-sociology.html). Students doing a major in criminology along with a major in one of these areas need to choose a different capstone unit for each major. A unit cannot be counted twice towards different majors.

Elective units

* Taught in Prato, Italy. This unit will require payment of an additional fee that may cover items such as accommodation, entry fees, excursions, coaches, transfers, flights and university administration.

Relevant courses

Diplomas

  • 2327 Diploma in Liberal Arts

Bachelors

Single degrees

  • 0002 Bachelor of Arts
  • 3907 Bachelor of Arts (English Language)
  • 3910 Bachelor of Arts (Global)
  • 4077 Bachelor of Arts (International)
  • 1366 Bachelor of Arts (Languages)
  • 1638 Bachelor of Arts Scholars Program
  • 4042 Bachelor of Journalism
  • 0202 Bachelor of Letters
  • 1275 Bachelor of Professional Communication

Double degrees

  • 4640 Bachelor of Aerospace Engineering (Honours) and Bachelor of Arts
  • 4098 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business
  • 0550 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business (Accounting)
  • 0553 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business (Banking and Finance)
  • 0555 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business (Management)
  • 0556 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business (Marketing)
  • 0542 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Commerce
  • 0170 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Economics
  • 1541 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education (Primary)
  • 1641 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education (Secondary)
  • 0080 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws
  • 3054 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Music
  • 0530 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
  • 3426 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Social Work
  • 0002 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Theology
  • 3779 Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Visual Arts
  • 4097 Bachelor of Arts Scholars Program and Bachelor of Commerce Scholars Program
  • 4403 Bachelor of Arts (Global) and Bachelor of Commerce
  • 3537 Bachelor of Arts (Global) and Bachelor of Science
  • 4634 Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) and Bachelor of Arts
  • 4644 Bachelor of Environmental Engineering (Honours) and Bachelor of Arts
  • 4426 Bachelor of Journalism and Bachelor of Business
  • 4425 Bachelor of Journalism and Bachelor of Commerce
  • 4069 Bachelor of Journalism and Bachelor of Science
  • 4648 Bachelor of Mechatronics Engineering (Honours) and Bachelor of Arts